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Field 130: American Sign Language CST
American Sign Language Structures and Comparisons and Deaf Culture

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Directions for American Sign Language Structures and Comparisons and Deaf Culture Selected-Response Questions

For the American Sign Language Structures and Comparisons and Deaf Culture section of the test, you will answer selected-response questions written in English.

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Sample American Sign Language Structures and Comparisons and Deaf Culture Selected-Response Questions

Competency 0002
American Sign Language Structures and Comparisons

1. When signing the adjective PRETTY in an ASL sentence, which facial articulation would typically be used to clarify the meaning of the adjective?

  1. clenching the teeth
  2. putting the tongue between the teeth
  3. pursing the lips tightly
  4. maintaining a neutral position of the eyebrows
Enter to expand or collapse answer. Answer expanded
Correct Response: C. This question requires examinees to analyze the nonmanual features/facial and body articulators of ASL at the phonological, morphological, and syntactic levels. Pursing the lips while signing an adjective is a way of clarifying the meaning of the adjective, so in this case, if signing the adjective PRETTY with pursed lips, it would clarify that meaning.

Competency 0003
Deaf Culture

2. Which recent technology has increased ease of communication and independence the most within the Deaf community?

  1. teletypewriter (TTY)
  2. closed captioning
  3. videophone (VP)
  4. alerting devices
Enter to expand or collapse answer. Answer expanded
Correct Response: C. This question requires examinees to describe the impact of technological advances on the practices of the Deaf community. The advent of videophones makes it easier for Deaf individuals to make calls to both hearing and Deaf individuals. Video relay services allow Deaf individuals to communicate more directly with others more easily than when previously using TTY. In addition, Deaf individuals can use a videophone to call others who sign and communicate directly with them. Technology in this domain keeps improving and even cell phones now allow for video communication.